Scoring Goals: Momentum Aids for Busy Creatives (lite)

smi_julianneblack

I just had my article Scoring Goals: Momentum Aids for Busy Creatives published in the October 2016 Story Monsters Ink Magazine (Five Star Publications) and I thought I would share an excerpt for anyone that needs some momentum :)

…  There is a huge part of us that loves the idea of setting New Year’s resolutions. It’s mainly because everyone does it, which gives us a sense of community support while looking at our own hopes and dreams, but partly because no one ever seems to remember what they were by mid-January, which alleviates the pressure to see them through. Usually, they all fall by the wayside because we try to immediately live up to huge year- long ideals and then panic when we realize that it might take some e ort and, heaven forbid, sacri ce.

One trick I’ve used for staying motivated and moving forward is to make my goals amazingly manageable. Really, I could almost stumble through the first several on this list by accident, but the success of completion is still there, pushing me forward … in bite-sized chunks, of course.

You can pretty much do a “Quickie Goal” in your sleep. Keep it simple, straightforward, and without room to wa e. Create a clean, concise statement in your mind that you will take the stairs instead of the elevator when you leave for the day. Or subscribe to that podcast about marketing. Or look up how much it costs to take part in some annual convention that you have always wanted to attend. Don’t say you will sign up (too scary!), just nd out how much it will cost. Often, our best goals are blocked because we simply don’t have enough information to make them a reality. e quickie goal is a fact- nder or baby-step goal that can be done with minimal commitment, distress, or wiggle room. Give yourself at least two each week.

The “Tomorrow Goal” needs to be an easy one, too, but it sets the pace for forward momentum, which hopefully translates into habit formation. Create a tomorrow goal of setting your morning alarm 20 minutes earlier or sketching in a journal on your lunch break instead of staring at your phone or tablet—still not that hard, but it will change things up a bit and open up your routine to alternatives that you had not yet considered bringing into your head space.

The “Next Week Goal” is another easy one but again just a tiny bit bigger. Maybe with your newfound 20 minutes in the morning, you’ll take care of the emails or bills that keep you from being creative during the evenings. Or make Tuesday and Thursday “stairs- only” days at work. Perhaps you cut out television two nights a week and read a book instead. Keep the goals attainable but a bit more out of the ordinary. If they start to take hold, you are on your way to a new chapter in your life!

Bigger still, the “Next Month Goal” needs to be a concrete number, something tangible and measurable. By next month, I will have written 10,000 words in the rst draft of my manuscript. By next month, I will be able to beat last month’s time up the 10 flights to my office. Try to avoid ominous goals like “will have nished my first draft” or “will have lost10 pounds.” These have the potential to sound scary and unreasonable in your head and therefore have the ability to sabotage your progress. Keep it positive and open. Ten thousand words a month or beating your last time will become part of your conscious momentum and will help you attain your ultimate goal of losing a speci c number of pounds or nishing your rst book without freaking out about where the nish line is. It is inevitable that you will eventually cross it to success…..

Hope these few ideas help you get father along towards your goals! Read the full article here: http://www.fivestarpublications.net/storymonsters_dir/pdf/smi-october-2016.pdf

Share your momentum experiences with me!

linkedin.com/in/julianneblack | facebook.com/JulianneDiBlasiBlack

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